Emergencies

Heatwave advice

The Met Office have issued a Heat-Health Watch Level-3 indicating a 90% risk of meeting trigger temperatures across London from 9am Monday 22 July 2019 until 9am Friday 26 July 2019.

Below are the maximum temperatures currently expected across the London area over the next few days:

  • Monday: 28-30 Celsius
  • Tuesday: 31-34 Celsius
  • Wednesday: 31-35 Celsius.
  • Thursday: 33-37 Celsius. There is considered to be around a 60% chance of the UK July record being broken (36.7 Celsius) and a 30% chance of the all-time UK record being broken (38.5 Celsius).

When a weather warning for a heatwave has been issued by the Met Office, Public Health England has some good advice for coping with the heat.

While everyone will be encouraged to enjoy the sunshine, such hot conditions can have health impacts on the elderly and young in particular, so please take care in the hot weather and look out for the most vulnerable including the elderly, the very young and those who may be at risk due to illness or disability.

Pet owners should also make sure their animals are kept cool and have enough water.

Top tips for staying safe in the hot weather:

  • look out for others, especially older people, young children and babies and those with underlying health conditions
  • drink plenty of water; sugary, alcoholic and caffeinated drinks can make you more dehydrated
  • close curtains in rooms that face the sun to keep indoor spaces cooler and remember it may be cooler outdoors than indoors
  • open windows when it feels cooler outside and it’s safe to do so
  • never leave infants, young children or animals in a closed, parked vehicle
  • try to keep out of the sun between 11am and 3pm
  • walk in the shade, apply sunscreen and wear a hat, if you have to go out in the heat
  • avoid physical exertion in the hottest parts of the day
  • wear light, loose fitting cotton clothes
  • If you have to go out in the heat, walk in the shade, apply sunscreen and wear a hat and light scarf.

Look out for others:

  • Keep an eye on isolated, elderly, ill or very young people and make sure they are able to keep cool.
  • Ensure that babies, children or elderly people are not left alone in stationary cars.
  • Check on elderly or sick neighbours, family or friends every day during a heatwave.
  • Be alert and call a doctor or social services if someone is unwell or further help is needed.

Cool yourself down:

  • Have plenty of cold drinks, and avoid excess alcohol, caffeine and hot drinks.
  • Eat cold foods, particularly salads and fruit with a high water content.
  • Take a cool shower, bath or body wash.
  • Sprinkle water over the skin or clothing, or keep a damp cloth on the back of your neck.

If you or others feel unwell:

  • Try to get help if you feel dizzy, weak, anxious or have intense thirst and headache; move to a cool place as soon as possible and measure your body temperature.
  • Drink some water or fruit juice to rehydrate.
  • Rest immediately in a cool place if you have painful muscular spasms (particularly in the legs, arms or abdomen, in many cases after sustained exercise during very hot weather), and drink oral rehydration solutions containing electrolytes.
  • Medical attention is needed if heat cramps last more than one hour.
  • Consult your doctor if you feel unusual symptoms or if symptoms persist.

There is more information available on the NHS website - 

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-body/heatwave-how-to-cope-in-hot-weather/

 

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